Celeb Chat with Wailing Souls

It’s your first time in Africa after trying a couple of times in the past…

Pipe: It’s a wonderful place. We had never been to Africa before and it’s a pleasure to be here because I had been told by a lot of people that Kenya is a special place for reggae music. People love us here.

Bread: Back in Jamaica we grew up under the British system and Kenya was under that same system too, British kind of school, British kind of government, so it’s similar in that way.

People feel that roots reggae is dead because of the kind of raunchy, explicit and no-message music that comes out of Jamaica nowadays. What is your take on that?

Pipe: You are right but that is one of the reasons why we still try and make good music even though we are living in the States. All these great producers in Jamaica want us to come back to Jamaica because they say we can bring back the music. We are working on album now and we want it to be released next year, we don’t want to rush it.

Bread: It will be our 27th album

What do you think of dancehall music?

Bread: Dancehall music is a part of reggae and we always have to tell people this. Dancehall music is the original Jamaican music because Jamaican music started in the dancehall!

Pipe: See what really happened is people confuse the word. They confused the word and that is why you see all this derogatory music floating around. When we recorded first the first place the music would play is the dancehall! So that’s why we called it dancehall. That’s where the music started.

Bread: Back in those days we didn’t have a lot of radio stations, we didn’t have social media. It was ghetto music so we didn’t get a lot of exposure. So the producers would have sound systems and the first place the music plays is the dancehall.

Can you tell us more about the album?

Bread: We are basically on a mission right now to take back the music. It’s going to be a massive album. Over 15 tracks so far.

Pipe: We still have more that we are working on. We are only using one producer because we only work with artistes if it is right.

Are there any young reggae/ragga artistes you would love to work with?

Bread: Tarrus Riley is a nice youth. We worked with Tarrus on tours and the reggae tunes so he’s a nice kid and we knew his father quite well. We did a song with Jimmy Riley ‘Come Check We’ plus he hooked us up with Negrille.

What was your connection to Bob Marley and The Wailers?

Pipe: We were living like brothers. If we had things to do they would join us and if they had things to do we would join them because everything was coming from the same house.

Bread: We all sang in ‘Trenchtown Rock.’ The Wailers and The Wailing Souls sing that song. That song was made in Pipe’s house. There are couple of other songs the two of us sang harmonies in like ‘Guava Jelly’ and ‘Lick Samba.’

Pipe: ‘Trenchtown Rock.’ That song would never reproduce again! 2 groups sang that song, never reproduce again.




Previous News Headlines
Next Mismuriuki's style

You might also like

Politics 0 Comments

MPs lash out at DCI boss Muhoro over delayed corruption investigations

MPs hit out at DCI boss Ndegwa Muhoro for failing to fast-track corruption cases The lawmakers want to now why investigations into youth fund have dragged for too long Muhoro

Latest 0 Comments

China bank to transform Sh163 billion of bad debt into securities

Agricultural Bank of China Ltd. is planning to offload bad loans by packaging them up as asset-backed securities. The move has been touted as China’s largest sale so far under

Politics 0 Comments

Evening News Headlines January 26, 2018

News Highlights Uhuru, Melinda Gates agree to improve healthcare access for women and girls President Uhuru Kenyatta and Melinda Gates have agreed to work together to strengthen the delivery of


No Comments Yet!

You can be first to comment this post!

Leave a Reply