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Financial Times

US Supreme Court deals immigration blow to Obama: President Barack Obama has suffered a crushing defeat over immigration at the Supreme Court that will leave the next US president to decide whether to deport or protect millions of unauthorised immigrants. The top US court maintained a freeze on what Mr Obama hoped would be a central part of his legacy, a plan to remove the deportation threat hanging over some 4m people in the US illegally. The fate of his plan, which affected immigrants whose children are US citizens or lawful permanent residents, will not now be decided until a new president is in the White House. The result reignites immigration as an issue in the bitter presidential campaign between Donald Trump, who has railed against illegal immigrants, and Hillary Clinton, who called the Supreme Court result “unacceptable”. Mr Obama decried the result, saying: “We’re going to have to decide whether we are people who accept the cruelty of ripping children from their parents’ arms or whether we actually value families and keep them together.”

The Guardian

Colombia and Farc rebels sign historic ceasefire deal to end 50-year conflict: The Colombian government and Farc guerrillas have declared the final day of one of the world’s oldest wars with the signing of a ceasefire agreement to end more than 50 years of bloodshed. “May this be the last day of the war,” said Farc chief Timoleón “Timochenko” Jiménez, his voice choked with tears. “We are close to a final peace accord,” he said, after shaking hands with Colombian president Juan Manuel Santos at the signing ceremony in Havana, which was attended by the UN secretary general, Ban Ki-moon. Although a final peace dealalso will require approval in a referendum, the formal cessation of hostilities between the two main combatants and the Farc’s acceptance of disarmament are key steps towards resolving a low-intensity war that has caused more than 250,000 deaths and the displacement of more than 6 million people.

 

New York Times

Supreme Court Tie Blocks Obama Immigration Plan: The Supreme Court announced on Thursday that it had deadlocked in a case challenging President Obama’s immigration plan, effectively ending what Mr. Obama had hoped would become one of his central legacies. The program would have shielded as many as five million undocumented immigrants from deportation and allowed them to legally work in the United States. The 4-4 tie, which left in place an appeals court ruling blocking the plan, amplified the contentious election-year debate over the nation’s immigration policy and presidential power. When the Supreme Court agreed to hear the case in January, it seemed poised to issue a major ruling on presidential power. That did not materialize, but the court’s action, which established no precedent and included no reasoning, was nonetheless perhaps its most important statement this term. The decision was just nine words long: “The judgment is affirmed by an equally divided court.”

The Economist

A split Supreme Court thwarts Obama’s immigration policy: For the third time since the death of Antonin Scalia February, a stymied Supreme Court has split 4-4 and failed to come to a decision. Of the three ties, today’s deadlock over United States v Texas, a challenge to Barack Obama’s immigration orders, carries the highest stakes. Up to 5m undocumented immigrants who were the intended beneficiaries of Mr Obama’s 2014 executive actions have lost their chance to apply for a programme that would have given them temporary permission to work and relief from deportation. The programme, Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA), sought to protect “hard-working people who have become integrated members of American society” and to keep families from being wrenched apart. DAPA did not confer legal status and was not a path to citizenship, but it gave people whose children were American citizens or permanent residents a chance to “come out of the shadows”, pay taxes and live without the constant fear of immigration agents knocking on their doors.

 

 

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